Mammoth Cave

After seeing Cumberland Falls, we drove to Mammoth Cave National Park, and we stayed two nights in a hotel in the park. We went on the Historic Tour of the cave, which was about two miles of walking and took about two hours. Before we went down into the cave, our guide described all the narrow places, which made me nervous, but once we got down into the cave, it was fun.

I thought it was amazing that there could be over 300 miles of passages in one cave. It seemed like we saw a lot, but we only went two miles.

The natural entrance to the cave

First we came to the Bottomless Pit. It wasn’t really bottomless, but it was deep. It was unnerving walking across and looking down between my feet through the metal walkway down into the pit.

 

Then there was a place called Fat Man’s Misery. That was the part that made me nervous when our guide described it beforehand. When you walk through, from the waist up it’s pretty wide, but below the waist there’s a really narrow passage between the rocks. It was really cool. It felt like I was wading through rock.

 

After that, the roof came down, and everyone had to duck. Even Rebekah.

At the end of the tour we came to a place called Mammoth Dome.

 

 

After our tour, we did a lot of hiking above ground. We saw the River Styx Spring,

the Green River,

an old graveyard where the man who explored a lot of the cave is buried,

and the sinkhole that created Mammoth Dome. For having created something so big, I kind of expected it to be a little larger. Nope. It was really small. I was kind of disappointed!

We also saw some wildlife. They seemed pretty comfortable with us walking around where they were.

We all had a lot of fun, and we picked the perfect time of year to go. Everywhere we went was beautiful. It was a wonderful vacation.

-Jenna

 

 

 

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This entry was posted in Family, hiking, Scenery, Seasons, Travel, Vacation, Wildlife. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Mammoth Cave

  1. freedlife says:

    Very interesting. The low-roof part could be called tall-man’s misery. At least for me.

  2. Aunt Beth says:

    Lovely post by Jenna! Great use of similes for description and complex sentences! Your writing teacher aunt

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